Atmospheric cross sections for the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program, March-April 1983
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Atmospheric cross sections for the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program, March-April 1983

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Published by U.S. Dept. of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Environmental Research Laboratories in Silver Spring, Md .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Aeronautics in meteorology -- Arctic regions.,
  • Aerosols -- Measurement.,
  • Ozone -- Measurement.,
  • Air masses -- Arctic regions.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementWolfgang E. Raatz, Russell C. Schnell, Barry A. Bodhaine.
SeriesNOAA technical memorandum ERL ARL -- 134.
ContributionsSchnell, Russell C., Bodhaine, Barry A., Environmental Research Laboratories (U.S.)
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 50 p. :
Number of Pages50
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17832340M

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Trajectory analysis of source regions influencing the south Greenland Ice Sheet during the Dye 3 Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program Cliff I Davidson, Jean-Luc Jaffrezo, Mitchell J . Horizontal ami vertical variability of ozone and CN concentrations, a and meteorological parameters, 21 March In Fig. 3 are presented the aircraft's flight level, and the observed gas, aerosol and meteorological para- Observations of Arctic haze during polar flights from Alaska to Norway MA by: EXPERIMENTAL During March (times and dates are given in GMT), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) conducted four research flights (about 40 research flight hours) over the Alaskan Arctic as part of the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP).Cited by:   The second Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP-II) was conducted across the Alaskan and Canadian Arctic in April , to study the in situ aerosol, and the chemical and optical properties of Arctic haze. The NOAA WP-3D aircraft, with special instrumentation added, made six flights during by:

During March and April of , in an effort to extend measurements of Arctic haze upward into the atmosphere, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) conducted a major portion of the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP).Cited by: The second Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP II) was conducted across the non-Soviet Arctic in March and April , to study the aerosol, chemical, and optical properties of Arctic . sources of aerosols in the Arctic atmosphere. This analysis helps explaining the intra- and inter-annual variability of both the residence time and the aerosol burden in the Arctic region. A comparison of the Arctic atmospheric aerosol burden in spring and spring is exposed in Section 5, before final conclusions in Section 6. 2. ). While the Arctic atmosphere has been previously ex-plored spatially, temporally, and compositionally (e.g., Hart-mann et al., ), Arctic snow and the mechanisms linking snow to the atmosphere have been the subject of only a rel-atively small number of studies (AMAP, ) despite the enormous amount of research conducted on the Arctic Cited by:

midlatitudes toward the Arctic and should be carefully characterized in aerosol models. Citation: Bourgeois, Q., and I. Bey (), Pollution transport efficiency toward the Arctic: Sensitivity to. Arctic aerosols and trace gases; observations at the Zeppelin station, Svalbard. Particles affect the Earths radiation balance by absorbing and scattering part of the radiation from the sun. Particles may also affect the climate indirectly through changes of the optical properties of clouds. ► Environmental archives of atmospheric Hg deposition in the Arctic are reviewed. ► These are compared against those predicted by three atmospheric models. ► The models provided good agreement with atmospheric [Hg 0 (g) ] and trends. ► Some environmental archives did not exhibit good agreement with model by: The Arctic and Antarctic covariance plots of the seasonal median values of α versus τ( μm) showed: (i) a considerable increase in τ( μm) for the Arctic aerosol from summer to winter.